The Moving Wall™
Sponsors' Handbook

Copyright © 2012 Vietnam Combat Veterans, Ltd.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I:  Preparation and Logistics

Honor and Respect

Publicity

Site Selection

Landscaping

Tents and Shelters

Information Tables

Communications

Wheelchairs/Carts

Cots

Restroom Facilities

Benches

Signs

Road Signs

Flagpoles

Sound System

Lighting

Maintenance and Grounds keeping

Volunteers

Food for Volunteers

Water Coffee

Directory of Names

Assembly / Disassembly of The Moving Wall

inclement Weather

Artifacts left at The Moving Wall

Ceremonies

Brochures / Programs

Schools

Escorts

Vendors

PART II:  Questions and Answers

Who Formed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC

Who Conceived The Moving Wall

What Is Official Name of The Moving Wall

When Did Project Begin

When Was Construction Completed

Who Financed The Moving Wall

What Are the Dates on the Wall

What Are the Dimensions of The Moving Wall

Which Are East Panels, Which Are West

What Are Bottom Numbers

What Are the Dots

Other Symbols

What Material Used to Make The Moving Wall

What Was the Process

PART III:  Miscellaneous Information and Addresses

What Happens to Artifacts

Address for The Moving Wall

Addresses for POW/MIA Information

Information About Your POW Bracelet

National Park Service Brochure

To Obtain a Directory of Names

How Many Communities

PART IV:  About the Names

Total Number of Names

Any Civilians

How Were Names Obtained

Names That Have Been Added

What Order Are Names Listed

Number of Women

Number of Chaplains

PART VII:  Information for Volunteers

Using the Directory of Names

Sample Personalized Name Rubbing Forms

Constructing Simple Foundation Photos



I. PREPARATION and LOGISTICS

 
Honor and Respect

It is important to maintain a dignified and respectful mood at The Moving Wall. This means staying in control of whom and what is going on at the Wall. Don't be afraid to tell some people no. Unfortunately, an event like this brings out some who would like to perform acts that are contradictory with the purpose of The Moving Wall. This includes those who want to publicize themselves, sell items, or promote their own causes and projects. Fortunately, they are few. Regardless of what some will claim to you, NO ONE is allowed to sell anything at The Moving Wall. Please be aware that there are NO vendors who are associated with The Moving Wall project. Likewise, no entertainment is allowed to take place at The Moving Wall.

The Moving Wall was years ahead of other traveling memorials that cropped up long after the years and months of designing and testing various materials, and long after The Moving Wall had proven its agenda as it toured the country. The Moving Wall is the only replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Other traveling memorials are simply replicas of The Moving Wall. The Moving Wall remains the only one that is maintained by the same Vietnam veterans who silk-screened the first name onto the first panel at the beginning of 1983. You are displaying some powerful art created with love by Vietnam veterans and their friends.

Like your own reason for wanting to bring it to your community, The Moving Wall was constructed for the sole purpose of SHARING.

 
Publicity

Let the people in the community, and the surrounding area, know you are and are bringing The Moving Wall to your community to Honor and Respect those that made the ultimate sacrifice through Remembrance and Education. By bringing The Moving Wall into your community, you are giving many people an opportunity they would never otherwise have.

There are so many media sources available today, (television, newspapers, internet, posters, flyers, etc.), that as many as possible should be utilized. It is heartbreaking when someone that will never make it to Washington, D.C., is not informed that The Moving Wall is in his or her community.

One person should be designated as the liaison between the sponsor and the media. This will eliminate people giving inaccurate or conflicting information to the media. This one spokesperson can then direct the media to the appropriate person they may interview, for particular aspects of the project.

When distributing media packets, it is important to clearly state who the sponsor is, your reasons for bringing The Moving Wall, and a clear and accurate description of The Moving Wall, including a brief history covering by whom it was built, and why. It is an extremely important story and many times it has been overlooked. People should never walk away from The Moving Wall with the idea that the government paid for this project, or some corporation funded it. The story is important, not to glorify any individuals, but to demonstrate the spirit and commitment that are an integral part of being American.

 

Site Selection

A grassy, park-like area with trees, if possible, makes an appropriate setting for The Moving Wall. Besides being aesthetically pleasing, a park-like setting is more conducive to tranquility and contemplation.
 
The sturdy and straight platform itself needs to set on a level plane. The structure will not be set up on an improperly built platform. It is braced with supports that need to be staked into the ground approximately 18 inches. For this reason, The Moving Wall may not be set up indoors. A location on concrete or asphalt will require drilling seventy-six one inch holes during set up, this is in addition to securing the level base prior to The Moving Wall’s arrival. See the section Assembly / Disassembly for further information on site preparation.
 

Landscaping

Many previous sponsors have had landscape designers, florists, etc. help with lining each end of The Moving Wall with shrubs, small trees, and flowers. The majority of these services and plants have been donated for the duration of The Moving Wall's display. It truly adds to the beauty and simplicity of The Moving Wall. Nothing should be placed where it will rub against The Moving Wall.
 

Tents and Shelters

It is suggested that arrangements be made to have a large tent or canopy at the site. This can be used for the main command post and information center. A canopy, or tent with the sides rolled up (weather permitting) is more inviting to visitors to approach for information. This can be a project that you may choose to invite a corporation, or perhaps a military unit, to donate the use of a canopy or tent in order to minimize your expenses. It is a good idea to have some type of shelter available in the event of bad weather.
 
When deciding where to place the tent, keep in mind that a large tent can easily block the view when taking photos of The Moving Wall.
 
A heater should be provided if the evenings are likely to be cool. Tables and chairs for the volunteers, with a few additional chairs for visitors, should be available.
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Information Tables

Information tables should be set up on what will be the main path from the parking area to The Moving Wall. If it is necessary to have the tables inside a tent, they should be placed close to the pathways. You should not try to have people enter a closed tent for name information. The items that are permitted on the information tables are:

The Directory of Names,

  1. pads for writing down the name, panel number and line number, and
  2. name rubbing forms and crayons for the name rubbings

You can also have a listing of the names from your area or your state, and a brief question and answer sheet for easy volunteer reference in case someone asks a question and the volunteer doesn't know the answer.

Keep boxes of Kleenex visible and easily accessible.

Literature or material promoting any organization or material that seeks contributions is not allowed on the information tables.

Communications

There needs to be a telephone or two-way radios on site for communications with the local emergency services in case they are needed. With the proliferation of cellular phones, this doesn't seem to be a problem.

Wheelchairs/Carts

Have at least two wheelchairs available at the information tent. A local hospital could donate them for the week. Golf carts may be used to shuttle the elderly and handicapped to and from the information tent but cannot approach The Moving Wall.

Cots

At least one cot should be available in the tent that can be used for emergencies and for volunteers to rest, if desired.

Restroom Facilities

If there are no buildings close by for public use of restrooms, portable chemical toilets will be needed.

Benches

Four to six benches may be placed about ten feet from The Moving Wall.

SIGNS

Signs that read: "No Pets, No Food, No Smoking" and "Please Turn Off Cell Phones" should be posted in strategic areas around the site.

Road Signs

Road signs are extremely important and often serve as the only means for some people to learn of The Moving Wall's display in your community. Several sponsors have made signs to direct people to the site. Other sponsors have received cooperation from their state's Department of Transportation who made standard highway signs and installed them on the Interstates. Surface street road signs should go up on the morning that The Moving Wall is assembled.

Flagpole

Most sponsors have flown the American flag and the POW/MIA flag, as well as the state flag. Some sponsors have had professionally-made poles installed, while others have made their own that looked almost as good for much less. Flagpoles should be placed at least the height of the pole away from The Moving Wall.

Sound System

A sound system should be used for ceremonies, reading of the names, etc., and the sound level should be appropriately adjusted for each event.

Lighting

The Moving Wall needs to be lit throughout the night for visitors as well as for security. The local power company could donate the labor and use of a free temporary line. In some areas, the National Guard has provided portable lights, and in other places, local electrical contractors have loaned and installed lighting fixtures. Fluorescent-type bulbs provide good lighting and no glare .

Maintenance and grounds keeping

Volunteers should be willing to keep the area free of litter, and can assist in cleaning The Moving Wall panels. Before wiping any of the panels, have the volunteers check with The Moving Wall driver. It is essential that nothing be done to the panels until given specific instructions. Only the cleaning supplies brought with The Moving Wall should be used on The Moving Wall. If The Moving Wall gets wet from rain, dew, etc., let it air dry. Do not attempt to dry The Moving Wall with rags or towels.

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Volunteers

In addition to committee members for media, supply, site preparations, etc., at least ten (10) volunteers will be needed for set up; two (2) volunteers for locating names; one (1) volunteer to walk The Moving Wall assisting visitors, and; two (2) security around the clock. Volunteers should read the front pages in the Directory of Names and have access to this handbook.

Food for the Volunteers

Past sponsors have had the community provide free meals and beverages for the volunteers. Usually the food is donated after fraternal or civic organizations, and businesses, are asked if they would help support The Moving Wall project.

It is recommended that you appoint a Supply Officer who can be responsible for getting a team of people together to get word out before The Moving Wall arrives. The supply officer and his/her team should be responsible during the week for bringing in the food.

This is what really makes The Moving Wall a true community project: the spirit of sharing and giving.

Water / Coffee

Water and coffee should be provided in the tent for volunteers.

The Directory of Names

In order to assure that you have enough copies of the Directory of Names on hand in the event of large crowds, you may wish to order additional copies (see page 13). Vietnam Combat Veterans,, Ltd. Memorial Fund will send you two Directory of Names several months prior to The Moving Wall's arrival.

As more people handle the books, the faster they begin to lose pages. It is recommended that your volunteers look up names for people in the directories. This will help to minimize the handling and facilitate the books lasting through the display period.

Assembly / disassembly of The Moving Wall

The minimum number of helpers should be ten. However, if you have ten or more people who have volunteered and more people show up and want to help, do not turn them away for fear of too many. Devitt's concept was to make this a "community project," letting people do whatever they could as their contribution to the project.

It takes approximately three hours to assemble The Moving Wall. Because of the vast number of people who have handled the panels, and the vast number who will handle them after it leaves your community, great care should be given in handling each item. While some people think that a panel is light enough for them to carry by themselves, we want two people to carry each panel. Besides making it easier for some, the main reason is to make certain that a panel isn't dropped or hit against something while carrying it. The slower the helpers work, the greater attention to detail and care they will give, thereby assuring that The Moving Wall will look as fine as it should when erected. All workers will be briefed by The Moving Wall personnel prior to handling and assembling. Tools used in assembling the structure are brought with The Moving Wall.

Prior to The Moving Wall’s arrival, it will be necessary to build a simple, level foundation of 2 x 4 lumber for The Moving Wall to set on (by michael gill). The Moving Wall is a V shape. The angle can be from 90° to 125° in order to make the structure fit in your location. The length of each end of The Wall is 126.5 ft.. The foundation can consist of 2 x 4 posts driven into the ground every four feet, and then cut the tops level with 2 x 4 lumber laid and nailed or screwed flat on top. This is where The Wall will set. When building the foundation, you want to keep the structure as close to the ground as possible. However, there are times when it may be up to two feet above the ground in places if that is what it takes to maintain a level platform. It must be sturdy and not wobble. We bring a cloth material with The Moving Wall to drape over the foundation so the platform it is not visible from the front.

It is advantageous to have the same individuals who helped set it up should perform disassembly of The Moving Wall, if possible. Disassembly takes about an hour and a half.

Inclement Weather

Walking on grass in heavy rain where drainage is poor quickly brings mud to the surface. Some sponsors have put small wood chips on the path. Others have built wooden walkways and others have gone so far as to pour asphalt or concrete walkways. Many who have done this had the materials and labor donated by local contractors.

If severe weather high winds or hail are imminent we will pull the panels and place them back in the crates. This will take about thirty minutes with a crew of eight. As time is not always available, it should be coordinated to have a barrier (trucks, buses) placed between The Moving Wall and the weather.

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Artifacts Left at The Moving Wall

Throughout the week, place letters, poems, photographs, etc. into plastic bags to help keep them dry. These items may be pinned to the cloth draping, never taped to The Moving Wall. Candles should be placed in a container before being lit. Prior to disassembly, volunteers can collect and place in boxes all the non-perishable artifacts that are preserved by Vietnam Combat Veterans, Ltd.

Ceremonies

It is entirely up to the sponsor as to how many ceremonies to have during the display. Typically, an opening ceremony is held within the first couple of days. This is generally the one the local media will give good coverage to, and it will help get the word out that The Moving Wall has arrived. The ceremony usually lasts 45 minutes to an hour, during which welcoming remarks are made, introduction of speakers, acknowledgments of volunteers, and giving a brief history of The Moving Wall. A lying of wreaths usually follows speakers, retiring of the Colors, and Taps.

Brochures / Programs

Most sponsors have printed up brochures, or programs, which are handed out to visitors throughout the display. The format and general information to include are up to the sponsor. Usually, the front page, or cover, should state the dates and the location of The Moving Wall display. The following pages usually go on to list dates and times of any ceremonies. These pages are also used to give information and history about The Moving Wall. The closing page is where most sponsors have thanked and/or listed those who were instrumental in bringing The Moving Wall through their donations of time, services, and money. Adding our web site www.TheMovingWall.org helps answer many questions.

Because printing costs can sometimes be high, some sponsors have used the brochure as a program for their opening ceremony, with the interior information listing times and speakers at the event. These programs were handed out throughout the display, even though they only covered the opening ceremony.

Schools

When arrangements are made to have schools visit The Moving Wall, arrival of the buses should be staggered so the group is manageable, and they should be told what they are going to see and what their proper behavior should be prior to going to The Moving Wall.

Escorts

Anyone wishing to escort The Moving Wall may only do so from the motel at which the drivers are staying to the display site, and only on the day of set up..

Vendors

Vendors are not encouraged, and are not permitted within 100 yards of The Moving Wall site or the entrance thereto.

II. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

Who formed the concept of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC?

The idea of a national Vietnam Veterans Memorial began when Dr. Victor Westphall of Angel Fire, NM began constructing a memorial in Angel Fire in memory of his son and those who died with him. The idea of having a Vietnam veterans memorial located in the Nation's capital was that of Jan Scruggs. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, Inc. was incorporated on April 27, 1979 in Washington, DC by a group of Vietnam veterans: Jan Scruggs, President of VVMF; Robert Doubek, Project Director and later as Executive Director; John Wheeler, Chairman of the Board. They lobbied Congress for a two-acre plot of land in Constitution Gardens. Significant initial support came from Senator Charles Mathias, Jr. of Maryland and Senator John Warner of Virginia. On July 1, 1980, President Jimmy Carter signed the legislation to provide a site in Constitution Gardens near the Lincoln Memorial. It was a three and a half year task to build the Memorial and to orchestrate a celebration, under the direction of Sandie Fauriol, to salute those who served in Vietnam. The Memorial wall was designed by Maya Ying Lin and was dedicated on November 13, 1982. The sculpture created by Frederick Hart called "The Three Servicemen" was unveiled on November 8, 1984, at which time control of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was turned over to the National Park Service. In 1986, Vietnam veteran nurse Diane Evans began the task of adding a statue to the site, recognizing the women who served in Vietnam. The statue, sculpted by Glenna Goodacre, was dedicated on November 11, 1993.

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Who conceived the idea of The Moving Wall?

The concept and actual building The Moving Wall grew out of the hard work and effort by John Devitt, Gerry Haver and Norris Shears, Vietnam veterans from California, concerned with what they might possibly do to somehow "keep alive" and share the power and good that Devitt had experienced while attending the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. At first, it was decided to build a replica and display it on the West Coast, so that people who lived so far from the Capital might have a chance to experience the Wall. While in Washington, DC in February 1983, John Devitt was explaining his project to several other veterans he had just met. One exclaimed, "What a great idea! Is this going to be portable?" Trying to avoid any negatives around his project, John simply nodded and replied, "Yeah, it's going to be portable."

What is the official name of this portable Wall?

Originally, John Devitt simply called it the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (Mobile), drawing on his own background as a helicopter crew chief in the First Cavalry Division (Airmobile). In February 1985, while the Wall was on display at the State of California Veterans Home in Yountville, California, the name Micki Voisard of St. Helena, California dubbed “The Moving Wall.” She is a member of Vietnam Combat Veterans, Ltd., and is a former flight attendant with Flying Tigers Airline. The Moving Wall has also been referred to as "The Traveling Wall,” the "Half-Scale Replica Wall,” and "The Healing Wall." However, its official name is The Moving Wall.

When did construction of The Moving Wall begin?

Construction began in February 1983 after experimenting with various methods of replicating the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC. Out of several methods tried, Devitt decided silk-screening was the best way to replicate the names, making each name as legible as it is on the Memorial in Washington. John Devitt, Gerry Haver, and Norris Shears did the actual construction and silk-screening of names. When they began, John was confident they could complete the project in two weeks.

When was The Moving Wall completed?

The Moving Wall was completed in October 1984, having taken nearly two years rather than the two weeks John had hoped for. On October 11th, 1984, the last panel was silk-screened, mounted on its frame while the ink was still wet, and loaded into its crate. On October 15th, The Moving Wall was erected for the first time in Tyler, Texas. Carl McClung, a Vietnam veteran in Tyler, had heard about The Moving Wall seven months before and had contacted Devitt to see about scheduling a date. The display in Tyler, Texas coincided with the East Texas Rose Festival.

Who paid for The Moving Wall?

The Moving Wall was paid for, like the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, from contributions made by the public.

To get the project started immediately, John Devitt and Gerry Haver pooled their own personal funds, which totaled barely over $2,500. Under normal circumstances, it would not have been enough cash to begin a project of this magnitude with any hopes of success. However, John was convinced this was not a "normal" project. With a lot of leg-work, John and Gerry found several trusting and supportive individuals and companies who helped out by granting these two strangers credit based on their presentation and promise to make good on any debts, even if they had to pay on their own in the end.

THE STATISTICS

What are the dates  1959  and  1975  on the Wall?

1959 is the year, which the Department of Defense gave as the date in which the first American casualties occurred. The first two men listed, Dale R. Buis and Chester N. Ovnard (this name was a misspelling, it should have read Chester A Ovnand), were military advisors, killed on July 8th in Bien Hoa while watching a movie in a mess tent. However, after the dedication of the Memorial in November 1982, it was learned that a Captain Harry Cramer had been killed in action in 1957.

His name was subsequently added to the Memorial, but it was impossible to change the 1959 date on the granite panel. In 2000, Richard Fitzgibbon, Jr. who had been killed in 1956 had his name inscribed on the Wall.

1975 was the year the last 18 casualties occurred. The 18 were casualties on May 15th during the operation to rescue the U.S. freighter Mayaguez and its crew.

What are the dimensions of The Moving Wall?

Overall length of The Moving Wall is 252.83 feet, which is slightly longer than half the length of the Memorial in Washington, DC. whose length is 493.5 feet. Composed of 74 separate frames, seventy frames contain two silk-screened panels. Each of the two walls that make up the entire Wall is 126.5 feet in length. The tallest panels have 137 lines of names, while the shortest panels at each end of the Wall have only one line. Originally, there were five names on each line, but with the addition of names, some lines now have six names. At the vertex of The Moving Wall, where the two walls join at an angle, the panels are six feet in height. In Washington, D.C., these same panels are 10.2 feet in height.

Which wall is East, which is West?

When facing The Moving Wall, the East wall is always to your right, starting with panel 1E (the panel with 1959 at the top, no panel number at the bottom). The West wall, starting with panel 1W (the panel with 1975 at the bottom) is just to the left of panel 1E.

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What are the numbers at the bottoms of the panels?

The numbers at the bottom identifying each panel are used in locating a name and are merely reference numbers. They do not signify dates. The numbered for both East and West walls start out from the center, extending to the far ends with number 70E or 70W. The last two panels on each end are blank. These blank panels merely finish out the artistic design and are not locations for adding additional names.

What are the white dots?

The white dots are used to help locate the line on which a name appears, and are particularly helpful when looking for a name on the larger panels. Each dot marks 20 lines. They are located in the margin of each panel having more than 20 lines.

What are the symbols beside each name?

The diamonds (P) and pluses (C) indicate whether a person is confirmed dead (including those who died from accidents and natural causes), or those missing. The diamonds indicate that a person's death was confirmed. The pluses indicate that a person remains missing and/or held as a prisoner of war, and are in no way meant to be a religious symbol. A plus symbol can be turned into a diamond if a person is declared dead or their remains are recovered. A circle symbolizing the "Circle of Life" will be inscribed around a plus if a person is freed and brought home alive.

What is The Moving Wall made of?

The Moving Wall is made of aluminum panels, having a surface painted with a two-part polyurethane gloss black which gives a mirror-like finish, mounted to angular aluminum frames. The original structure was made of black Plexiglas panels mounted to plywood and lumber frames.

The original structure toured for almost three years before it was decided to replace the structure because of so much weathering. The aluminum structure is supported from the back by 76 steel square tubular braces.

How is the process done of putting the names on the panels?

After attempting several methods that proved unsatisfactory, John Devitt called the memorial fund in Washington, D.C. and told them that his various attempts had failed to produce the one thing John saw as crucial: clarity of the names. He informed them that silk-screening was near exact in replicating the "look,” but the cost of typesetting nearly 58,000 names was prohibitive. He asked to "borrow" the negatives that the original stencils for the Wall in Washington were made from. It was approved and the Cooper-Lecky Partnership, an architectural firm that supervised construction of the Memorial in Washington, loaned the stencils to John. The process John used for making the silk-screen stencils was similar to the process in making the stencils used in masking off the granite panels. All the construction and the silk-screening of all the names were actually done by John Devitt, Gerry Haver, and Norris Shears. Twenty seven years after the first panel was silk-screened, John continues to do the silk-screening whenever panels need to be replaced.

MISCELLANEOUS

What happens to the articles left at The Moving Wall by friends or relatives?

The artifacts, which people leave just as they have done in Washington, DC since the beginning, are collected, boxed, and marked at each location then taken back to White Pine, Michigan. They are currently stored in The Moving Wall’s warehouse/office complex. A museum will be built and all the artifacts that have been left at The Moving Wall will be displayed.

Who can I contact if I have any questions about The Moving Wall and its display schedules?

All questions concerning The Moving Wall can be addressed to:

Vietnam Combat Veterans, Ltd.
Attn: The Moving Wall
P.O. Box 715
White Pine, Michigan 49971

You can also get information via the Internet from The Moving Wall's web site at http://www.TheMovingWall.org or by phone at (906) 885-5599.

Where can I write to obtain the latest information on American POW/MIAs still unaccounted for in Southeast Asia?

There are several organizations and individuals throughout the country who are dedicated to resolving the issue of live Americans in Southeast Asia. Several put out newsletters of the most current information. Many have information posted on the Internet. Only a few are listed here:

Task Force Omega of Southern California
P.O. Box 687
Glendora, CA 91740
e-mail: tfosoca@email.msn.com

P.O.W. Network
www.pownetwork.org
(Contains one of the most extensive databases covering the MIA issue from all wars)

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Where can I obtain current information about the M.I.A. whose bracelet I wear?

If you wear a POW/MIA bracelet and wish to learn more about the person whose name it bears, or to write to a returned P.O.W., or to send them your bracelet, send your letter in a properly stamped envelope to the appropriate branch of service with a cover letter from you asking them to forward your letter to the person or family. Because of the Privacy Act, the Casualty Officers are unable to give out addresses, but they are more than willing to forward mail upon request. The addresses for each branch of service are:

        

Army

Attn: Casualty Officer
H.Q.D.A. (DAPC-PED-P)
2461 Eisenhower Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22331-0482
(800) 892-2490

Air Force

Attn: Chief, MPD
HQ AFMPC/DPMCBRandolph Air Force Base, TX 78150-6001
(800) 531-5501

Marine Corps

Attn: Casualty Officer
HQ USMC (Code: MHP-10)
Washington, DC 20380-0001
(800) 847-1597

Navy

Attn: Casualty Officer
Department of Navy, NMPC-N64DD
Washington, DC 20370-5640
(800) 443-9298



 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Who can I get in touch with to get a copy of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (Washington, DC) brochure?

Write to the following:

Mall Operations/Vietnam Veterans Memorial
National Park Service
National Capitol Parks - Central
900 Ohio Drive SW
Washington, DC 20242

Where can I get a Vietnam Veterans Memorial Directory of Names?

A copy of the Directory of Names can be purchased from:

Guest Services, Inc.
3055 Prosperity Avenue
Fairfax, VA 22031-2290
(703) 849-9300

Using a credit card, you can also purchase a directory from the Guest Services, Inc. kiosk located at the Lincoln Memorial by telephoning (202) 347-2054.

How many communities have hosted The Moving Wall?

As of January 1, 2012, The Moving Wall has been displayed in 1,260 communities.

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THE NAMES

How many names are on the Wall?

As of January 1, 2012 there are 58,272 names listed on the memorial. Approximately 1300 of these are still unaccounted for prisoners of war (POWs) and missing in action (MIAs).

Are there any civilians listed on the Wall?

No. The memorial is dedicated to the 2.7 million men and women who served in the U.S. military in Vietnam.

How were the names obtained?

During and after the Vietnam War, the Department of Defense (DoD) compiled a list of combat zone casualties according to criteria set out in a 1965 Presidential Executive Order (11216). The Executive Order specified Vietnam and adjacent coastal waters as the combat zone. The combat zone was expanded when hostilities spread to include Laos and Cambodia. If the DoD considered an individual to be a Vietnam War fatality or to be missing, his/her name would be included. The VVMF verified the DoD list, where possible, by cross checking it against the casualty data provided by the individual services. Each name was then verified by the National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis, Missouri. After computer processing, the names were checked manually for errors.

How many names have been added since the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated?

Twenty four groups of names have been added since the memorial was dedicated. The DoD reviewed each case thoroughly before the names were added to the official list.

  1. In group 1 (1983) 68 names added,
  2. group 2 (1984) 15 names added,
  3. group 3 (1986) 110 names added,
  4. group 4 (1987) 24 names added,
  5. group 5 (1989) 19 names added,
  6. group 6 (1991) 8 names added,
  7. group 7 (1993) 8 names added,
  8. group 8 (1994) 5 names added,
  9. group 9 (1996) 6 names added,
  10. group 10 (1997) 7 names added,
  11. group 11 (1998) 4 names added,
  12. group 12 (1999) 5 names added,
  13. group 13 (2000) 1 name added,
  14. group 14 (2001) 6 names added,
  15. group 15 (2002) 3 names added,
  16. group 16 (2003) 6 names added,
  17. group 17 (2004) 10 names added,
  18. group 18 (2005) 4 names added,
  19. group 19 (2006) 4 names added,
  20. group 20 (2007) 3 names added,
  21. group 21 (2008) 5 names added,
  22. group 22 (2009) 1 name added,
  23. group 23 (2010) 6 names added, and
  24. group 24 (2011) 5 names added
  25. group 25 (2012) 10 names added
  26. group 26 (2013) 1 name added, bringing the total number of men and women on The Wall to 58,283.

Visit Sharon Denitto's site at http://www.touchthewall.org/ for a full listing of the names added from 1982 through 2013.

The bulk of the names in the first group of 68 were Marines killed when their R&R flight crashed in Hong Kong. Those in the group of 110 were added when the geographic criteria was enlarged to include people killed outside the war zone (95 service members) while on or in direct support of combat missions, and 15 men who had subsequently died of wounds or injuries received in Vietnam. Whenever names are added to the memorial in Washington, they are added to The Moving Wall at the end of that display year.

How are the names arranged on the Wall?

The names are in chronological order, according to the date of casualty. Within each day, the names are alphabetized. For the POW/MIAs, the date of casualty is the date they were reported captured or missing. The list starts and ends at the apex (center) of the Wall, beginning at the date 1959 and the inscription at the top of panel 1E:

IN HONOR OF THE MEN AND WOMEN OF THE
ARMED FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES
WHO SERVED IN THE VIETNAM WAR. THE
NAMES OF THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES
AND OF THOSE WHO REMAIN MISSING ARE
INSCRIBED IN THE ORDER THEY WERE
TAKEN FROM US.

 

The listing goes out to the end of the east wall (70E), then resumes at the far left end of the west wall (70W), ending with the date 1975 and the inscription at the bottom of panel 1W:

OUR NATION HONORS THE COURAGE,
SACRIFICE AND DEVOTION TO DUTY AND
COUNTRY OF ITS VIETNAM VETERANS. THIS
MEMORIAL WAS BUILT WITH PRIVATE
CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE AMERICAN
PEOPLE. NOVEMBER 11, 1982.

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Although 1959 is marked as the beginning on panel 1E, Army Captain Harry Cramer was killed October 21, 1957. His name was added to line 78, panel 1E, in 1983. In addition, in 2000, the name of Air Force Sgt. Richard B Fitzgibbon Jr., who was killed June 8, 1956, was added. On September 7, 1965 his son, USMC LCpl Richard B Fitzgibbon III was killed in action.

How many of the names listed are women?

There are eight women listed. Seven were US Army nurses and one was an Air Force nurse. They are:

NAME

PANEL / ROW

NAME

PANEL / ROW

Alexander, Eleanor Grace   

31E 008
 

Donovan, Pamela Dorothy   

53W 043

Drazba, Carol Ann   

05E 046

Graham, Annie Ruth   

48W 012

Jones, Elizabeth Ann   

05E 047

Klinker, Mary Therese   

01W 122

Lane, Sharon Ann   

23W 112

Orlowski, Hedwig Diane   

31E 015

How many of the names listed are military chaplains?

There are 16 military chaplains listed on the memorial. Two were awarded the Medal of Honor, the military's highest award for valor.

THE MOVING WALL DISPLAY HISTORY

VOLUNTEERS' INFORMATION
How do volunteers use the Directory of Names? The Directory of Names is arranged in alphabetical order. Each name and the information associated with that name take up one (1) line, as shown in the following example:

NAME
RANK
SVC.
DATE OF BIRTH
DATE OF CASUALTY
CITY
STATE
MIA
PANEL NO.
LINE NO.

ABSTON JAMES ESTUS JR

PFC

AR

02 NOV 44

27 FEB 67

COTTONDALE

AL

*

15E

102

ACALOTTO ROBERT JOSEPH

SSGT

AR

30 JAN 51

20 FEB 71

GREENSBURG

PA

 

5W

122

ACERET PEPITO RIVERA

SP5

AR

09 NOV 42

07 DEC 69

EWA

HI

 

15W

34

 How do volunteers use the Directory of Names? The Directory of Names is arranged in alphabetical order. Each name and the information associated with that name take up one (1) line, as shown in the following example:

In the above example, the last column on the right indicates the line, counting from the top of the panel, on which the name is inscribed. An asterisk in the third column from the right denotes that a man is missing and unaccounted for.

There are five important things that volunteers should be aware of when looking up names in the Directory of Names:

1. If unsure how a name is spelled, always ask the person. Names rarely follow common rules of spelling. Keep in mind there are many variations in the spelling of names. If the person doesn't recall the exact spelling, ask other people around the table for assistance. Pronounce the name out loud and ask for suggestions in spelling the name. It works.

2. Be certain that you are looking on the correct line for the panel and line number. After a short time looking up names, it is easy for your eyes to move up or down a line when following the line over from the name to the panel number. Use a ruler or edge of plain paper to help you keep on the correct line.

3. If there are several names that have the same first and last name, check the middle initial. If the person does not know the middle name, check on date of birth or date of casualty or branch of service. Use caution if using city and state for verification. The city and state entries in the Directory constitute the Home of Record, a location chosen by each service person representing the place at which the service person wanted to be discharged. Therefore, the city and state entry will not always be the place of birth or actual residence.

4. Names with two capital letters (i.e. McDonald) are often located at the end of the first letter listings.

5. Pass on to the Driver/Caretaker any discrepancies and a way to contact the person claiming the discrepancy.

In addition to using the Directory of Names to locate a name, the list of names of service members and servicewomen who became casualties in a given time period can be searched. The list of names for the following time periods begin on the panels and lines indicated

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DATE

PANEL

LINE

DATE

PPANEL

LINE

JAN 59

1E

1

JAN 69

35W

14

JAN 62

1E

4

FEB 69

33W

30

JAN 63

1E

15

MAR 69

31W

98

JAN 64

1E

39

APR 69

28W

101

JAN 65

1E

81

MAY 69

26W

89

APR 65

1E

99

JUN 69

23W

34

JUL 65

2E

26

JUL 69

21W

41

OCT 65

2E

100

AUG 69

20W

82

NOV 65

3E

10

SEP 69

18W

18

DEC 65

3E

119

OCT 69

17W

21

JAN 66

4E

47

NOV 69

16W

11

FEB 66

4E

127

DEC 69

15W

12

MAR 66

5E

92

JAN 70

15W

113

APR 66

6E

70

FEB 70

14W

88

MAY 66

7E

15

MAR 70

13W

70

JUN 66

7E

130

APR 70

12W

64

JUL 66

8E

114

MAY 70

11W

78

AUG 66

9E

92

JUN 70

10W

129

SEP 66

10E

59

JUL 70

9W

108

OCT 66

11E

32

AUG 70

8W

73

NOV 66

12E

2

SEP 70

7W

29

DEC 66

12E

131

OCT 70

7W

102

JAN 67

13E

106

NOV 70

6W

33

FEB 67

14E

102

DEC 70

6W

100

MAR 67

15E

124

JAN 71

5W

19

APR 67

17E

83

FEB 71

5W

71

MAY 67

19E

2

MAR 71

4W

13

JUN 67

21E

25

APR 71

4W

98

JUL 67

22E

90

MAY 71

3W

21

AUG 67

24E

58

JUN 71

3W

60

SEP 67

25E

76

JUL 71

3W

96

OCT 67

27E

35

AUG 71

3W

120

NOV 67

28E

107

SEP 71

2W

7

DEC 67

31E

20

OCT 71

2W

32

JAN 68

33E

11

NOV 71

2W

58

FEB 68

36E

45

DEC 71

2W

82

MAR 68

42E

12

JAN 72

2W

94

APR 68

47E

29

FEB 72

2W

103

MAY 68

53E

27

MAR 72

2W

112

JUN 68

62W

19

APR 72

2W

126

JUL 68

54W

25

MAY 72

1W

10

AUG 68

50W

40

JUN 72

1W

34

SEP 68

45W

18

JUL 72

1W

51

OCT 68

42W

52

OCT 72

1W

76

NOV 68

40W

70

JAN 73

1W

108

DEC 68

37W

15

JAN 75

1W

121

 

NAME RUBBINGS

Name rubbings can be taken from The Moving Wall, giving  fairly good results when done with care following the directions below.

The ONLY objects that are permitted for name rubbings are lumber crayons. Absolutely no pointed pencils or pens are to be used. Good results are obtained using a black "lumber crayon" which resembles a large crayon, but rather than round, they are hex shaped. The flat edge of these crayons is ideal for rendering names from The Moving Wall. You will need to strip the paper, and scrape the glue, from the lumber crayon, then score it with a knife dividing it into four sections at which point they snap easily. Holding the piece of crayon by the ends and the rubbing paper firmly over the name, rub back and forth lightly, until the name begins to appear.

It sometimes takes a little practice, so the volunteers at the Wall should feel free to practice so they can assist people who may be having problems.

Almost any weight paper up to 24 lb will work, except slick tracing paper. Typically, people have used 20 lb bond or copier paper, and even onion skin. Many favor vellum.

The name rubbing master forms included in this handbook can be copied and used as is, or you can personalize them with your town's name and dates of The Moving Wall's visit. There is also a sample form showing what this looks like.

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NOTE: Because of the potential additional wear that constant rubbing causes to the panels, we cannot make name-rubbing activity available to the tens of thousands of school children that visit The Moving Wall each year. The exception would be a student who has a relative's name on the Wall.

 

Sample name-rubbing form personalized

Rubbing Form

 


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08-Jun-2013